How Amazon can make up for the epic fail of Prime Day

How Amazon can make up for the epic fail of Prime Day

By now I’m sure you’ve read the hilarious tweets about Amazon’s incredibly disappointing Prime Day, an event that was supposed to bring even greater deals than Black Friday (though anyone looking for lube, The Lord of the Rings trilogy, or the unrated version of 50 Shades made out like bandits). That said, I can’t decide whether or not this PR disaster is a result of the lousy deals themselves or because of all of the hype associated with the 20th anniversary sale. I guess people were just expecting more from the “Earth’s most customer-centric company” (PS: I didn’t make that up; I picked it up directly from their website). They have clearly set a very high bar in customer service and there’s a lesson to be learned in all of this. Here are some ways that Amazon can come out on top for their loyal customers. If the power of social media has taught us anything, it’s that news of bad service (and a disappointed fan base) travels fast. Amazon can bulk up their community managers and personally respond to every negative tweet/comment that came in with a funny retort. Offer Prime membership to ALL users for free for at least a three-month period. Anyone who is already a Prime member should be able to enjoy other perks or possibly a rollover credit on membership. Do it all over again. A mega company like Amazon has the resources to pull together a sale that delivers on all promises. Enough with the headphones, vitamins, and paper towels—offer the kinds of sales that actually pique interest. Any suggestions for Amazon? Leave them...
Why you should create a landing page for your business

Why you should create a landing page for your business

I recently had the opportunity to pitch the idea of a landing page to a client, which turned out to be a huge success. I decided to take this opportunity to discuss why having a landing page can help you find leads for your business and how to convert those leads into sales. Before we get started (and in case you don’t already know), a landing page is a page created and hosted on the web with a clear call to action. That part is very important, because it’s what distinguishes a landing page from any other website out there. Maybe you’re hosting a webinar and you want to get people to register. Or perhaps you’re asking readers to subscribe to your mailing list or you’re having an in-store promo. Whatever the purpose, your landing page needs to be clear and focused around a form-fill. The aforementioned client had a rare opportunity to appear on a national food network on a television show about visionaries/entrepreneurs in the food industry. Expected viewership was about one million people. Before the show aired, the client and I discussed several strategies for online marketing leading up to and during the show’s airtime. My business partner helped create a landing page with a form to collect names and email addresses of prospects. Once these leads submitted their information, they were emailed a promo code, which they could then use to receive free shipping on my client’s product. We created Facebook ads that targeted people who watch the network as well as those who expressed interest in the machine my client’s product was designed for....
What I learned about sales… from my trip to the Bahamas

What I learned about sales… from my trip to the Bahamas

Admittedly, I’ve never been much of a salesperson. From a young age, I would fumble on my words and play with my sleeves while going door to door in hopes of selling my Girl Scout cookies as my mom waited behind. On one occasion, I even told my older neighbor Joe that no, he could not buy the entire box of thin mints, I was only selling one cookie at a time. (face palm) That was coincidentally also the day my parents realized there was simply no hope for me where my business acumen was concerned. Thankfully, I’ve learned a thing or two over the years. About two weeks ago, I took a much-needed vacation and learned that the slogan “It’s better in the Bahamas” is true for a variety of reasons (did I mention 80 degree weather?). What really stood out to me (in addition to the obvious crystal clear waters, sugar sand beaches, and delicious/warm sunshine) was the inadvertent salesmanship of the sweet locals. With the exception of the Bahamians I met at the Straw Market who were definitely looking to make a sale, I found myself entranced by the way they easily touted the benefits of their island and asked that I return. It was a reoccurring theme. My presence in the Bahamas was seen as a gift; but what would make it even sweeter would be a return to show the locals how much I enjoyed my trip. When I got back to the frigid temps in New Jersey, I kept thinking about the conversations I had with people there and how much their infectious...