What I learned at #LTR2015

What I learned at #LTR2015

I never turn down the chance to learn and grow both professionally and personally, which is why I jumped at the opportunity to attend last week’s Long-Term Relationships seminar (#LTR2015) when an old coworker offered me a ticket. Hosted by Appboy, this event took place at the beautiful Apella Lounge in NYC and featured speakers from Mapquest, Glamsquad, 1-800-Flowers, B&H Photo, and Etsy to name just a few. Sadly, I didn’t have much time before my carriage turned into a pumpkin, so I dove right in and listened intently to a seminar entitled “The Emotional Response.” What I found really interesting was how various companies measure the emotional feedback they receive from their customers. Laura Maxwell, Director of Marketing for Mapquest, said it’s difficult to quantify results based on social media feedback since posts are often so polarizing, so the company uses consumer surveys to find out different areas that need improvement. Eli Weiss, Chief Mobile Strategist of B&H Photo mentioned the company’s desire to create an interactive experience that allowed customers to engage in a logo design. Alexandra Wilkis Wilson, cofounder and CEO of Glamsquad, told attendees about members of the “Glamfam” and specific messaging points they use to run different promotions throughout the year (including their recent Halloween promo), that make customers feel as though they’re a part of the family. I think my favorite part of the seminar was listening to Tamara McCleary speak. She is the creator of RelationShift and she gave an incredibly captivating presentation on the power of relationships in business and creating brand loyalty. We are wired to seek out relationships and...
How Amazon can make up for the epic fail of Prime Day

How Amazon can make up for the epic fail of Prime Day

By now I’m sure you’ve read the hilarious tweets about Amazon’s incredibly disappointing Prime Day, an event that was supposed to bring even greater deals than Black Friday (though anyone looking for lube, The Lord of the Rings trilogy, or the unrated version of 50 Shades made out like bandits). That said, I can’t decide whether or not this PR disaster is a result of the lousy deals themselves or because of all of the hype associated with the 20th anniversary sale. I guess people were just expecting more from the “Earth’s most customer-centric company” (PS: I didn’t make that up; I picked it up directly from their website). They have clearly set a very high bar in customer service and there’s a lesson to be learned in all of this. Here are some ways that Amazon can come out on top for their loyal customers. If the power of social media has taught us anything, it’s that news of bad service (and a disappointed fan base) travels fast. Amazon can bulk up their community managers and personally respond to every negative tweet/comment that came in with a funny retort. Offer Prime membership to ALL users for free for at least a three-month period. Anyone who is already a Prime member should be able to enjoy other perks or possibly a rollover credit on membership. Do it all over again. A mega company like Amazon has the resources to pull together a sale that delivers on all promises. Enough with the headphones, vitamins, and paper towels—offer the kinds of sales that actually pique interest. Any suggestions for Amazon? Leave them...
The most important thing you might not be doing in your business

The most important thing you might not be doing in your business

It’s hard to believe but I’ve actually been a blogger at My Pixie Blog since 2009. By most standards, that would make me an old timer, especially in a realm that is constantly evolving and in a space where so many sadly suffer from blogger burnout (it’s a thing) and close up shop for good. With more than 1.5 million blog posts published each day per Technorati, it’s important to stay relevant, to post often, and to give your readers a reason to return. Over the years I’ve learned a few things as a blogger that I think are applicable in many different areas of business. The one that stands out the most (and a recurring theme in my own life lately) is that communication is key. What happens when a visitor leaves a thoughtful comment on your blog and you don’t answer it? Or when a brand reaches out for a partnership and you let the message get buried in your inbox? On the flip side of this, what if you are a brand and you’ve reached out to a blogger for a giveaway but never followed up to personally thank the blogger for hosting and promoting your product? These are bad business practices that might result in one less pair of eyes returning to read your posts or a partnership in jeopardy. I believe the best businesses are the ones that put the needs of the customer above all else. I’m just finishing up a book entitled Be Our Guest which discusses the Disney experience and the unparalleled level of customer service that the franchise provides for...